Oasis Montana Inc.
Renewable Energy Supply and Design
406-777-4321or 4309
e-mail: info@oasismontana.com
Home Page: www.oasismontana.com

Visit us on the web for product and project information!
For grid-tied power systems, www.grid-tie.com
Solar water pumping:  www.PVsolarpumps.com
Non-electric gas appliances, www.LPappliances.com
Efficient and DC appliances, www.eco-fridge.com
And our main page at www.oasismontana.com


Renewable Energy News Bites and Tidbits
Oasis Fall 2005 Newsletter

 

ATTN: Solar Supporters: Our friends at the American Solar Energy Society are sponsoring the National Solar Tour this Saturday October 1st. To tour a solar powered home or business near you, go to: http://WWW.NATIONALSOLARTOUR.ORG

"Our Wind Co-Op" Brings Small Wind Turbines to the Northwest. Our Wind Co-Op is a cooperative that invests in small-scale (10-kilowatt) wind turbines for farms, ranches, and public and private facilities in the Northwest. Initially supported by grants from DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Rural Development program, Our Wind Co-Op is creating low-risk opportunities to explore on-farm green power production, distribution, ownership, and marketing models to meet local energy needs. http://www.ourwind.org/windcoop/ for more information.

Poop Power: Prometheus Energy of Tukwila, WA, recently scored $8 million in financing to turn cow manure and trash into usable energy. The firm is developing a new technology that transforms methane into liquid natural gas, and hopes to deploy their system at several Yakima County farms later this year. Grants from USDA and DOE have helped support their R&D efforts.  Check out http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/venture/225088_vc20.html  for the whole poop scoop. 

Wind Farm Construction Generates Economic Boom: In Montana, thirty people are already at work constructing the Judith Gap Energy Center, and local businesses eagerly await the arrival of 180 to 200 more workers next month to begin erecting some 90 big wind turbines. Nearly all the work force is coming from Montana. http://www.harvestcleanenergy.org/enews/enews_0605/enews_0605_Judith_Gap.htm

Solar Energy Payback Will Be One Year Within a Decade: According to DOE's National Renewable Energy Lab, the payback for multicrystalline PV modules is four years for systems using current technology, but only two years for technology just coming on to the market. For thin-film solar modules, the payback is three years using current technology and one year for anticipated technology. According to the NREL report, "Based on models and real data, the idea that PV cannot pay back its energy investment is simply a myth." http://www.sparksdata.co.uk/refocus/fp_showdoc.asp?docid=45660037&accnum=1&topics=

Yale Survey Shows Overwhelming Support for Clean Energy: A new research study from Yale University found that 88% of people surveyed support expanded wind energy development. This yearly survey of 1000 adults also found that more than nine out of ten Americans are worried about dependence on foreign oil, and even greater numbers want government to develop new clean energy technologies. http://www.yale.edu/envirocenter/environmentalpoll.htm (so, folks, don’t forget to put your vote where it counts the most!)

Can Wind Power The World? Two Stanford researchers have put out a new scientific study suggesting that the potential for wind-driven energy is actually many times greater than was previously believed, and may, in fact, be more than enough to meet the whole world's energy demands. Analyzing thousands of sites around the globe, the researchers estimated that wind power could produce 72 terawatts of energy per year—many times greater than the 1.6-1.8 terawatts the world used in 2000. North America, meanwhile, was found to have the greatest wind power potential, though its unclear whether the United States could satisfy its own needs through domestic wind power alone. Our government provides only tenuous backing at this point, and is far behind Europe in wind generation development. And of course, climate change has the potential to alter our landscape and poses ecological risks far beyond anything wind power could do. While blanket wind farms may be not be the answer, one can no longer ignore the potential for sensibly-sited farms to produce large amounts of clean energy http://www.motherjones.com/mojoblog/archives/2005/05/can_wind_power.html

 

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Quotable Quotes

Henry David Thoreau If a man walks in the woods for love of them half of each day, he is in danger of being regarded as a loafer. But if he spends his days as a speculator, shearing off those woods and making the earth bald before her time, he is deemed an industrious and enterprising citizen.

 

Mahatma Gandhi The future depends on what we do in the present. 

 

Mark Twain Sometimes I wonder whether the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on, or by imbeciles who really mean it.

 

Wangara Maathai

2004 Nobel Peace Price Winner

 

A degraded environment leads to a stalemate for scarce resources and may culminate in poverty or even conflict.

 

David Suzuki

 - scientist

We see the beauty through filters shaped by our values and beliefs. Some people think wind turbines are ugly. I think smokestacks, smog, acid rain, nuclear cooling towers, coal-fired power plants and climate change are ugly. I think windmills are beautiful. They harness the power of the wind to supply us with heat and light. They provide local jobs. They help clean our air and reduce climate change. And if one day, I look out from my cabin’s porch and see a row of windmills spinning in the distance, I won’t curse them. I will praise them. It will mean we are finally getting somewhere.

 

U.S. President George W. Bush

speaking to the press aboard Air Force One, 6/4/2003

 

I don’t spend a lot of time thinking about why I do things.

 

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Now in autumn, we are enjoying cool and wet (even snowy) conditions, but it was one hot and smoky summer and fall for many parts of the western U.S., and Montana was no exception. We were smug with our good snowpack, back in spring. Then our summer started with a week of 100+ degree weather, and continued to stay hot. We were blanketed in smoke from the horrific fires (1.3 million acres burned) until the middle of September, and unfortunately, many homes and a few lives have been lost. We have been able to help some people with water pumping to protect their properties, but our drought conditions and warm temps made for a very dry western tinderbox. If only those folks in Texas could’ve share perhaps 1/20th of their deluge from their state…

Even so, the garden and fruit trees kept us busy, and despite the smoke we still enjoyed camping, fishing, and canoeing in our local river (even though the water was quite low). We hope our legislators will work on commonsense future measures to mitigate the effects of warming temperatures and prolonged drought. One thought we have had (since we were less than a mile from our local small airport, a helibase that launched many helicopters and other aircraft for fighting fires) is that actual planning for these events would be a good idea (seeing as they are now part of our new normal)—how about reservoirs near these airports to make hauling the big buckets faster and more affordable? Here in Stevensville, we have several large irrigation ditches in close proximity to our airfield…. Well, it’s just my 2 cents worth!

PICOCELL controller inverter for array-direct water pumping for your 240VAC AC pump
In this issue we have some new products to share; one is an exciting new AC pump controller/inverter that can run your 240VAC (or 120V, or 3 phase, or 230VAC 50 hz) 1/3 to 2 horsepower pump directly off of a solar array – click here for more information on the PICOCELL controller/inverter (cost: $1220 plus shipping). This exciting new technology is designed for off-grid use, or emergency back-up. We have installation manuals, spec sheets, and pump kit information on our water pumping site.  Call or e-mail for more information.

New, small Energy Star rated AC refrigerator
We also have a new, small AC refrigerator, 7.1 cu.ft. for your home or cabin, the CP972SS. It’s a great size for space-limited kitchens, only 22”W x 22”D x 57”H and will sell at the great price of $459 plus shipping. With its lean size, the CP972SS is the ideal refrigerator for studio apartments, yachts, offices, and other settings in need of reliable cooling in a slim-fitting footprint. Visit here for more information on this and other (larger) refrigerators.

The best nuclear generating station is 93 million miles away, and is available for pretty much everyone!
Thomas Edison quote on Solar Energy

Iron Edison Batteries
We also have a new line of batteries to offer, manufactured by Iron Edison;
visit our information on this exciting new product line.

WHY IS THE PRICE OF SOLAR MODULES LIKELY TO INCREASE?

The International Trade Commission (ITC) is responding to a lawsuit brought about by SolarWorld and Suniva (U.S. module manufacturers) that low cost imported (i.e. Chinese) solar modules have hurt their competitiveness, so they are asking for a tariff on imported solar panels to ‘level the playing field’. Many pro-solar groups are opposing these tariffs, as they will increase the dollar-per-watt cost of installed solar power systems, and very negatively impact job growth in the solar sector – which had been bourgeoning in the past few years. In fact, it is estimated that 1 out of 50 new jobs is in the renewable energy sector. The ITC has approved tariffs, but it will be up the President Trump to set the rate; those of us in the industry are waiting to see what will happen, and many jobs are on hold pending the decision. It sounds like costs may go up 10% to as much as 40%. For more information visit:  https://pv-magazine-usa.com/2017/10/31/breaking-usitc-recommends-quotas-tariffs-on-crystalline-silicon-solar-imports/  

Renewable Energy (and related) news bites

             1912 Warning on coal cuasing climate change

 

QUOTABLE QUOTES:

  • When autumn darkness falls, what we will remember are the small acts of kindness: a cake, a hug, an invitation to talk, and every single rose. These are all expressions of a nation coming together and caring about its people.
    --Jens Stoltenberg
  • Designers want me to dress like Spring, in billowing things. I don't feel like Spring. I feel like a warm red Autumn.
    --Marilyn Monroe
  • The cost of solar energy has not been opened up because the oil industry does not own the sun.
    –Ralph Nader
  • The spring, summer, is quite a hectic time for people in their lives, but then it comes to autumn, and to winter, and you can't but help think back to the year that was, and then hopefully looking forward to the year that is approaching.
    –Enya
  • A kestrel can and does hover in the dead calm of summer days, when there is not the faintest breath of wind. He will, and does, hover in the still, soft atmosphere of early autumn, when the gossamer falls in showers, coming straight down as if it were raining silk.
    --Richard Jefferies
  • I love nuclear energy! It's just that I prefer fusion to fission. And it just so happens that there's an enormous fusion reactor safely banked a few million miles from us. It delivers more than we could ever use in just about 8 minutes. And it's wireless!
    --Unknown
  • I prefer winter and fall, when you feel the bone structure of the landscape - the loneliness of it, the dead feeling of winter. Something waits beneath it, the whole story doesn't show.
    -- Andrew Wyeth
  • There has been a systematic repression of solar energy. It seems pretty funny to me that the government, if it is completely neutral--why wouldn't they pursue this far safer alternative of solar energy with the same intent that they pursue nuclear energy? Solar power is the last energy resource that isn't owned yet--nobody taxes the sun yet.
    --Bonnie Raitt
  • The problem with winter sports is that--follow me closely here--they generally take place in winter.
    --Dave Barry
  • If we had no winter, the spring would not be so pleasant: if we did not sometimes taste of adversity, prosperity would not be so welcome.
    --Anne Bradstreet